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“Does Trump’s ‘tightening financial vise’ create a security risk?”:

The Leader of the Free World owes hundreds of millions of dollars, and we have no idea to whom. He is personally on the hook for these debts; the debts will soon have to be repaid; and given the state of his finances, it’s far from clear how Trump will meet his obligations.

If you or I had these kinds of financial liabilities, we wouldn’t even be approved for a security clearance, because the security risks would be seen as far too great. And yet, Donald Trump has these liabilities right now — and he’s headed into a re-election fight.

Much has been made in recent years about Trump wanting to stay in power in order to avoid possible prosecutions and to run out the clock on assorted statutes of limitations. But this new angle is arguably even more significant: the Republican may also be desperate to remain in office as a way of staving off his unidentified creditors who will soon expect payment on the president’s considerable debts.

Indeed, it’s hardly unreasonable to think Trump holding onto power might be one of the few options he has remaining to prevent his creditors from seizing his personal assets.

I’ll also add that I have read some commentary suggesting that there’s not really all that much there there—Trump has talked endlessly about how much he loves debt and has shown no shame about declaring bankruptcy and stiffing his creditors before, so these mystery men he owes money to have no more hold over him than anyone else.

I’d suggest the difference here is that, unlike most of his previous debt, he has personally guaranteed these loans. If he is unable to pay them back when they come due (NARRATOR: He will not be able to pay them back when they come due), it is not a case where he can cut ties with the business and run. They are coming after him personally.